Celsius to Fahrenheit
Conversion Chart


Have you ever wondered about this Celsius to Fahrenheit degree thing?

What's the meaning of it?
After all, we all know what is like to feel cold, warm or unbearable, right? So what's the point in using different names and numbers to describe the same feeling?
Are we getting any smarter by any chance?

Hardly think so, if you ask me, but we are here to make a change, aren't we? It would be lovely to make some sense out of this, wouldn't you say so?


For the time being - apologies for that - I need to explain what feeling cold or warm means in different parts of the world in terms of names and numbers.

In South America, we deal with the Celsius thing, so if you read 30 degrees or over you are better off by remaining in the bathtub or in the ocean, anything else means sweating your head off.

That's your call, but remember, South America is much warmer than any temperature reading.
It's the natural warmth of South American people what makes the difference.


Celsius Fahrenheit
15 59
16 60.8
17 62.6
18 64.4
19 66.2
20 68
21 69.8
22 71.6
23 73.4
24 75.2
25 77
26 78.8
27 80.6
28 82.4
29 84.2
30 86
31 87.8
32 89.6
33 91.4
34 93.2
35 95
36 96.8
37 98.6
38 100.4
39 102.2
Celsius Fahrenheit
-10 14
-9 15.8
-8 17.6
-7 19.4
-6 21.2
-5 23
-4 24.8
-3 26.6
-2 28.4
-1 30.2
0 32
1 33.8
2 35.6
3 37.4
4 39.2
5 41
6 42.8
7 44.6
8 46.4
9 48.2
10 50
11 51.8
12 53.6
13 55.4
14 57.2

Celsius is a temperature scale that describes temperatures in Celsius degrees (C), used all over the world but US, where the Fahrenheit scale applies to all weather forecasts, including for regulating temperature in households.

Celsius and Fahrenheit scales coincide at -40.

In case you're fond of maths and want to do the conversion yourself, here are the conversion formulas:
[C] = ([F] - 32) 5/9
[F] = [C] 9/5 + 32


If you are like me, I'd rather go for a ready made Celsius to Fahrenheit conversion chart like the one on the right and save the hassle.


Quick facts on Celsius to Fahrenheit degrees...


Celsius temperature is also referred to as "centigrade", consisting of or divided in 100 degrees.
The name comes from Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701-1744).

Fahrenheit temperature scale comes from German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686-1736).
Today, most of the world has shifted to the Celsius scale, apart from US and - to a lesser extent - Canada and UK.

The Celsius to Fahrenheit scale won't make your vacation any easier in terms of heat or cold, but it will help you to understand why.
To help you grasp the idea about what kind of weather you shall expect when you travel to South America, visit climate of South America.


Enjoy the ride and have unique South America travel experience along the way!..





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